Global Challenges Teaching Award

The Global Challenges Teaching Award supports US and UK higher education institution teaching faculty to co-deliver a virtual exchange course for undergraduate students.

George L. Daniels

George L. Daniels

The University of Alabama - Global Challenges Teaching Award exploring racial injustice

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George L. Daniels

George L. Daniels

The University of Alabama - Global Challenges Teaching Award exploring racial injustice

George is a former television news producer turned mass media scholar.   Since 2003, he’s been teaching newswriting and reporting, electronic news reporting, media management and host of other courses at  The University of Alabama in Tuscaloosa. 

In 2021, he co-edited Teaching Race: Struggles, Strategies and Scholarship for the Mass Communication Classroom.  Currently, he’s finishing his second book, Barrier Breakers: Media Educators Meeting the Diversity Challenge Across the Decades.  An associate professor of journalism and creative media, Dr. Daniels researches issues of race in the media workplace and the dynamics of race in news reporting.  He’s the winner of several national awards for his teaching in the areas of media management, service learning and community engagement. In 2021, he was the recipient the Gene Burd Award in Urban Journalism Studies for his ongoing studies of the contemporary Black press.

From 2013 to 2019, Dr. Daniels was assistant dean for administration in The University of Alabama’s College of Communication and Information Sciences. He’s worked as a broadcast journalist in Atlanta, Ga., Cincinnati. Ohio and his hometown of Richmond, Virginia.  Currently,  Dr. Daniels serves as the inaugural Faculty Fellow for Diversity and Inclusion for the Broadcast Education Association.

Dr Amal Abu-Bakare

Dr Amal Abu-Bakare

The University of Liverpool - Global Challenges Teaching Award exploring racial injustice

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Dr Amal Abu-Bakare

Dr Amal Abu-Bakare

The University of Liverpool - Global Challenges Teaching Award exploring racial injustice

Dr Amal Abu-Bakare is a British-Canadian lecturer in the politics of race and decolonial studies at the University of Liverpool and a Visiting Fellow at the University of South Wales’ International Centre for Policing & Security.

Amal earned her doctoral degree from Aberystwyth University’s Department of International Politics in 2020 where she successfully defended her thesis researching how logics of racialisation structure counterterrorism approaches in the United Kingdom and Canada. She is also an alumna of the University of Warwick, where she completed her master’s in International Relations; and of Queen’s University, in Kingston, Ontario, where she completed her bachelor’s degree in Politics and Global Development Studies, with honours. 

Amal continues to publish a breadth of literature at the intersection of anticolonial scholarship, terrorism studies expertise, and International Relations Theory. Her writing can be found in journals such as International Affairs, Alternatives, International Politics Reviews, Media Diversified, E-International Relations, and soon, International Political Sociology.

Jonathan Kennedy

Jonathan Kennedy

Queen Mary University of London - Global Challenges Teaching Award exploring pandemics

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Jonathan Kennedy

Jonathan Kennedy

Queen Mary University of London - Global Challenges Teaching Award exploring pandemics

Jonathan is a Reader in Politics and Global Health in the Centre for Public Health and Policy at Queen Mary University of London.  

His research uses insights from sociology, political economy, anthropology, and international relations to analyse important public health problems. He has explored the link between populist politics and vaccine hesitancy in Europe, the negative impact of the CIA drone strikes on polio eradication efforts in Pakistan, and how Saudi-led bombing of Yemen resulted in the world’s worst cholera outbreak in 2017. Currently, he is working on a book about the impact of infectious disease on human history – from the extinction of the Neanderthals forty thousand years ago to covid-19 – that will be published by Penguin in 2023.  

He obtained his PhD in Sociology from the University of Cambridge (2013). Prior to joining Queen Mary University in 2016, he taught international development at the Department of Political Science, University College London and worked as a research associate at the Department of Sociology, University of Cambridge.

Staci Strobl

Staci Strobl

Shenandoah University (Virginia) - Global Challenges Teaching Award exploring climate change

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Staci Strobl

Staci Strobl

Shenandoah University (Virginia) - Global Challenges Teaching Award exploring climate change

Staci Strobl is a Professor of Criminology and Criminal Justice at Shenandoah University in Virginia (USA) and a research fellow in the Sectarianism, Proxies, and Desectarianization Center (SEPAD), University of Lancaster (UK).

In 2019, she and two colleagues (Lieselot Bisshop and Julie Viollaz) received the Outstanding Article Award given by the Division of White Collar and Corporate Crime of the American Society of Criminology. The article, entitled “Getting into deep water: Coastal land loss and state-corporate crime in the Louisiana bayou,” was published in the British Journal of Criminology in 2018. Strobl’s research focuses on environmental crime, state and corporate crime, and comparative criminal justice with particular attention paid to gender, ethnic, religious and sect identity. She is the author of Sectarian Order in Bahrain: The Social and Colonial Origins of Criminal Justice (Lexington Books, 2018). 

She has also earned the Radzinowicz Memorial Prize for her article in the British Journal of Criminology about the criminalization of female domestic workers in Bahrain. Strobl is published in the International Journal for Crime, Justice and Social Democracy; International Journal of Comparative and Applied Criminal Justice; The Review of Faith and International Affairs; and Nidaba: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Middle Eastern Studies, among other journals. 

Jessie Dubreuil

Jessie Dubreuil

University of California - Global Challenges Teaching Award exploring pandemics

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Jessie Dubreuil

Jessie Dubreuil

University of California - Global Challenges Teaching Award exploring pandemics

Jessie Dubreuil is Associate Director for Learning at the Center for Innovations in Teaching and Learning (CITL) at the University of California, Santa Cruz, as well as faculty in the Writing Program and at Merrill College.

Jessie received her undergraduate and masters degrees in English from Stanford University and her Ph.D. in English Language and Literature from the University of Virginia. Prior to joining the UCSC community, Jessie was the Director of the First Year Experience (FYE) Program at Colorado College, where she taught literature and humanities courses and focused her research and teaching on experiential and community-based learning. There, she spearheaded grants, programs, and partnerships to incorporate Community Based Learning into the first year curriculum, oversaw the FYE Mentor program, and received the Exemplary Achievement in Community Engaged Teaching Award (2015). Almost a decade ago, she began exploring the rhetoric of health and illness with students and community partners at the Moab Free Health Clinic. Jessie is currently the faculty fellow in the UCSC Division of Global Engagement’s Global Classrooms Initiative, and is co-editor, with Sikina Jinnah, Jody Greene, and Sam Foster (eds.), of Teaching Environmental Politics and Justice, under contract at Edward Elgar Publishers.

Sammie Buzzard

Sammie Buzzard

Cardiff University - Global Challenges Teaching Award exploring climate change

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Sammie Buzzard

Sammie Buzzard

Cardiff University - Global Challenges Teaching Award exploring climate change

Sammie Buzzard is a glaciologist and climate scientist, who works as a lecturer in climate science at Cardiff University, Wales. She holds a Master’s degree in mathematics from the University of Exeter and completed her PhD at the University of Reading during which she investigated the surface hydrology of Antarctica's ice shelves.

Her research interests including modelling how and where ice shelves may become vulnerable to sudden collapse due to melting on their surfaces. This is important in determining Antarctica's future contribution to global sea level. Her interests in the polar regions also extend to the surface hydrology of Greenland and snow and melt on Arctic sea ice.

Sammie is the International Arctic Sciences Committee 2020 cryosphere fellow and is also a fellow of the UK’s Software Sustainability Institute. She has a passion for science communication and regularly speaks at theatre shows targeted at teenagers, as well as in schools, museums and in various forms of media. She has a strong interest in increasing the diversity of those working and studying in STEM fields.