2018-19 American Scholar Award grantees

Igor V. Alabugin

Igor V. Alabugin

University of Sheffield Scholar Award, University of Sheffield - Chemistry

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Igor V. Alabugin

Igor V. Alabugin

University of Sheffield Scholar Award, University of Sheffield - Chemistry

Igor V. Alabugin grew up in Siberia and moved to Moscow to earn his PhD from Lomonosov Moscow State University. After a postdoctoral study at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, he joined faculty of Florida State University (FSU) in 2000. Currently, he is the Cottrell Professor at the FSU Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry where his professional efforts are focused on the discovery of new ways to control chemical structure and reactivity. His interests span development of new chemical transformations, design of light-activated anticancer drugs, and construction of carbon-rich nanostructures. He is the first recipient of all three FSU Undergraduate Awards: Teaching, Advising, and Research Mentor. As a Fulbright Scholar, he will be working with the University of Sheffield on the fundamental factors involved in phosphate group transfer, one of the key reactions of biology. He enjoys traveling with his wife Irina, and discussing science with their son Alexander. He is looking forward to learning more about the UK's rich academic and cultural heritage and exploring the Peak District hiking trails.

Gregory Baldi

Gregory Baldi

National Library of Scotland Scholar Award, National Library of Scotland - Political Science

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Gregory Baldi

Gregory Baldi

National Library of Scotland Scholar Award, National Library of Scotland - Political Science

Gregory Baldi is an associate professor of political science at Western Illinois University. He received his Ph.D. in Government from Georgetown University. His research focuses on the development of political and social institutions in Western Europe. Dr. Baldi's interest in British politics and history was sparked by a variety of sources, including a youthful exposure to Elizabethan literature, Victorian history, and the first Clash album. As a Fulbright scholar at the National Library of Scotland, he will be working with library collections specialists on a project examining the history of the Scottish National Party.

Jon Bannon

Jon Bannon

Lancaster University (STEM) Scholar Award, Lancaster University - Mathematics

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Jon Bannon

Jon Bannon

Lancaster University (STEM) Scholar Award, Lancaster University - Mathematics

Jon Bannon, Professor of Mathematics at Siena College in Loudonville, New York, studies correspondences of von Neumann algebras, objects that paint a mathematical picture of the flow of information between quantum systems. He has taken many undergraduate coauthors on his mathematical treks, and plans to lead many more such expeditions in years to come.  Inspired by a spirit of global collaboration in mathematics, he frequents www.mathoverflow.org, a revolutionary online mathematical research community. Here, Bannon met British mathematician Yemon Choi, with whom conversations led to the present Fulbright project, aiming to use the above quantum information channels to build a new theoretical bridge between the continuous and the discrete.    Professor Bannon believes that one of the most important aspects of mathematics is its ability to transcend cultural borders. As a Fulbright Scholar, Professor Bannon looks forward to sharing the experience of British culture with his wife and two homeschooled children, and to forming long-term collaborations and friendships in the UK.

Neilesh Bose

Neilesh Bose

King's College London Research Scholar Award, KCL - History

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Neilesh Bose

Neilesh Bose

King's College London Research Scholar Award, KCL - History

Neilesh Bose holds a PhD in South Asian history from Tufts University in Medford, MA and holds a wide variety of research and teaching interests, including the history of modern South Asia (the Indian subcontinent), the British Empire’s many histories, decolonisation, and the history of diasporas and migrations. Published academic writing has covered topics such as Islam in South Asia, regional and national imaginations in South Asia, intellectual history, and the world of theater, popular culture, and performance studies. His current research project concerns the history of religion in colonial India, with an emphasis on interactions between Indian religious reformers and interlocutors in Great Britain and North America. Having taught previously at the University of North Texas and St. John’s University in New York, he now holds the Canada Research Chair in Global and Comparative History at the University of Victoria in British Columbia, Canada. In previous appointments as well as his current position, he has organised seminars and workshops on a range of issues, including the history of Islam in South Asia, the politics of culture in South Asian diasporas, biography in South Asian history, as well as the intersections of global history and world literature. At the University of Victoria, he maintains an ongoing seminar series about globalisation in the humanities entitled the Global South Colloquium. A lover of travel, food, theatre, and opera, his academic work has taken him to venues across the United States as well as locales in India, Bangladesh, Sri Lanka, the U.K., South Africa, Germany, Finland, and others. During his Fulbright grant to Kings College London, he will make use of collections in the British Library, the SOAS Library, and related archives in the vibrant London region. The dynamic intellectual culture at Kings College and in London more broadly will provide an excellent environment to carry out his work.

Judith A. Byfield

Judith A. Byfield

Global Scholar Award, African Studies Center, University of Oxford - History

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Judith A. Byfield

Judith A. Byfield

Global Scholar Award, African Studies Center, University of Oxford - History

Judith A. Byfield, originally from Jamaica, did most of her growing up in New York City. She is an Associate Professor in the Department of History, Cornell University. A core faculty member of the Department of History, Feminist, Gender and Sexuality Studies and a member of the Africana Studies field, Byfield focuses primarily on African and Caribbean history. Her research has largely explored women's social and economic history and political activism in Western Nigeria. She made extensive use of British archives for her first two books, The Bluest Hands: A Social and Economic History of Women Indigo Dyers in Western Nigeria, 1890-1940 (Heinemann, 2002) and A Great Upheaval: Women, Taxes, and Nationalist Politics in Nigeria, 1945 – 1951 (Ohio University Press, forthcoming).  Her new project, Curry Goat and Gari: West Indian Women in 20th Century Lagosian Society, is inspired by the West Indian women she met during her research trips to Nigeria. Many met their husbands in the UK and moved to Nigeria with them. She became fascinated by the very creative ways in which they bridged their Caribbean and British backgrounds with Nigerian cultures. This project hopes to reveal new insights about diaspora formation and transnationalism through the experiences of these dynamic and enterprising women.

Theodore F. Cook, Jr.

Theodore F. Cook, Jr.

SOAS University of London Reasearch Scholar Award, School of Oriental and African Studies - History

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Theodore F. Cook, Jr.

Theodore F. Cook, Jr.

SOAS University of London Reasearch Scholar Award, School of Oriental and African Studies - History

Theodore F. Cook, Jr. was awarded a B.A. with Honors and Distinction in History at Trinity College (Hartford), then went to London for a M.A. in Far Eastern Studies, before earning his Ph.D. in Japanese History at Princeton University. Professor of History and Asian Studies Programme Director at William Paterson University of New Jersey, he has devoted much of his research career to studying war and society in comparative perspective, specialising in oral history and Japan in the 20th Century. He is co-author with Haruko Taya Cook of Japan at War: An Oral History. Cook has been a Secretary of the Navy Fellow and Visiting Professor of Strategy at the U.S. Naval War College in Newport, Rhode Island and a Fulbright Senior Research Fellow at the University of New South Wales and the Australian Defence Force Academy. He was Director of a collaborative multi-disciplinary research project on how war and memory have shaped Japanese culture at the International Research Center for Japanese Studies in Kyoto, Japan. As a Fulbright Scholar at the School of Oriental and African Studies, based at the Japan Research Centre, Cook returns to where he began Japanese Studies and looks forward to working with British experts on war, memory, and society. He hopes to contribute to SOAS commemorative programmes as an alumnus while in London.

Jessica M. Dandona

Jessica M. Dandona

University of Dundee (Art and Design) Scholar Award, Duncan of Jordanstone College of Art and Design - Art History

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Jessica M. Dandona

Jessica M. Dandona

University of Dundee (Art and Design) Scholar Award, Duncan of Jordanstone College of Art and Design - Art History

Jessica M. Dandona was raised in hot and humid central Florida before studying in Providence, Paris, Québec, and Berkeley. She earned her B.A. in Art History and French Studies from Brown University and her Ph.D. in Art History from UC Berkeley. Dr. Dandona is currently Associate Professor of Liberal Arts at the Minneapolis College of Art and Design, where she enjoys working with the next generation of image-makers. Her first book, Nature and the Nation in Fin-de-Siècle France: The Art of Emile Gallé and the Ecole de Nancy, published by Routledge in 2017, traces the affinities between art nouveau, theories of evolution, and French nationalism in the 1890s. As a Fulbright Scholar at the Duncan of Jordanstone School of Art and Design (University of Dundee), Dr. Dandona will explore Scotland’s rich history of medical innovation, focusing on how visual imagery in the form of anatomical treatises, pedagogical models, and public health pamphlets worked to establish medical authority and to shape public perceptions of the body at the end of the 19th century.

B. Josephine Ensign

B. Josephine Ensign

Edinburgh Napier University Scholar Award, Edinburgh Napier University - Nursing

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B. Josephine Ensign

B. Josephine Ensign

Edinburgh Napier University Scholar Award, Edinburgh Napier University - Nursing

Josephine Ensign is a nurse with a doctorate in public health from the Johns Hopkins University. She is Professor of Community Health at the University of Washington (UW) School of Nursing in Seattle, Washington where she teaches health policy, narrative medicine, and health humanities. She is also Adjunct Professor, UW School of Arts and Sciences, Department of Gender, Women and Sexuality Studies; and Affiliate Faculty, UW Simpson Center for the Humanities Certificate Programme in Public Scholarship. Ensign is Director of the University of Washington Doorway Project, an innovative community-campus partnership programme addressing youth homelessness in Seattle. During her Fulbright grant period she will be studying the ways in which empathy can be enhanced in nurses specifically for the care of homeless and marginalised populations.

Marsha D. Fowler

Marsha D. Fowler

University of Surrey Scholar Award, University of Surrey - Ethics/Nursing

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Marsha D. Fowler

Marsha D. Fowler

University of Surrey Scholar Award, University of Surrey - Ethics/Nursing

Marsha Fowler was reared in San Francisco and now resides in Los Angeles County. She holds a BS and MS in nursing from the University of California at San Francisco, and a PhD in Religion and Social Ethics from the University of Southern California. Her research focuses on the history and development of ethics in nursing, (1860s—present), on social ethics, and on ethics in relation to the social location of historically “women’s professions.” She architected and worked on a 12-year project by the Ministry of Health for the reform of nursing education in Russia, and has consulted on ethics and bioethics in a number of countries. She is an avid gardener, furniture-maker, camper, novice birder, and road cyclist. As a Fulbright scholar she will be researching the first century of nursing ethics in Great Britain, 1860s—1965. She hopes to illuminate the UK—US interactions in ethics in early modern nursing and the contributions of early nursing ethics to the contemporary moral identity of nursing.

Harcourt Fuller

Harcourt Fuller

Global Scholar Award, University College London, the University of the West Indies-Mona, and the Jamaica National Heritage Trust - History

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Harcourt Fuller

Harcourt Fuller

Global Scholar Award, University College London, the University of the West Indies-Mona, and the Jamaica National Heritage Trust - History

London has special significance to Harcourt Fuller, Associate Professor of History at Georgia State University in Atlanta. His Jamaican Maroon family is part of the Windrush generation, and he earned his PhD in International History at LSE. His multidisciplinary research and teaching expertise include the history of West Africa (Ghana in particular), and the African Diaspora in the Americas. Fuller focuses on the history of resistance against slavery and colonialism, and the construction of national and ethno-national identity in the Africana World. His current research project is a wholistic study of the history and contemporary realities of Jamaican Maroon communities. He is the producer of the award-winning 1-hour documentary-film on the 18th century African-Jamaican Maroon leader, Queen Nanny: Legendary Maroon Chieftainess (2015). As a Fulbright Global Scholar, Fuller will be in residence at the UCL Institute of the Americas, as well as the University of the West Indies-Mona, and the Jamaica National Heritage Trust, working on his book project, Queen Nanny of the Maroons: The Trans-National History, Legend and Legacy of an African-Jamaican National Heroine.

Laura D. Gelfand

Laura D. Gelfand

University of York (History of Art) Scholar Award, University of York - Art History

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Laura D. Gelfand

Laura D. Gelfand

University of York (History of Art) Scholar Award, University of York - Art History

Laura D. Gelfand will spend her Fulbright fellowship at the University of York conducting research on representations of wolves in art and literature. Her interest in the animals started while she was editing a book about their canine cousins entitled, Our Dogs, Our Selves: Dogs in Medieval and Early Modern Art, Literature, and Society (Brill, 2016). Gelfand is a Professor of Art History at Utah State University where she has served as Head of the Department of Art + Design for the last seven years. The Fulbright fellowship will give her the opportunity to work with faculty who are engaged with animal studies networks across the UK, while taking advantage of the University of York’s numerous centers for interdisciplinary studies. Gelfand anticipates publishing the results of this research in a book that she hopes will help inform current and future debates about rewilding and wolf conservation.

Andrew Hartman

Andrew Hartman

British Library Eccles Centre Scholar Award, British Library Eccles Centre - History

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Andrew Hartman

Andrew Hartman

British Library Eccles Centre Scholar Award, British Library Eccles Centre - History

Andrew Hartman teaches history at Illinois State University in Normal, Illinois. Born and raised in mountainous Colorado, living in the landscape-challenged Midwest has taken some getting used to but he and his family--wife Erica, and sons Asa (10) and Eli (8)--are quite content in Illinois. Hartman earned his Ph.D. at George Washington University in Washington, D.C., the perfect place to study American history. He has written two books, “Education and the Cold War: The Battle for the American School,” and “A War for the Soul of America: A History of the Culture Wars.” Hartman is excited by the opportunity provided by the Fulbright to spend six months researching his new book, “Karl Marx in America,” at the British Library Eccles Center. Working in the shadow of Marx, who conducted his research on “Capital” at the British Museum’s reading room, is beyond thrilling for him! This will be Hartman’s second Fulbright. The first, a year-long teaching fellowship in Denmark, was a life-changing experience.

Lauren Heidbrink

Lauren Heidbrink

EU Schuman 70th Anniversary Scholar Award, University of Birmingham - Anthropology

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Lauren Heidbrink

Lauren Heidbrink

EU Schuman 70th Anniversary Scholar Award, University of Birmingham - Anthropology

Lauren Heidbrink is an anthropologist and Assistant Professor in Human Development at California State University, Long Beach. Her research and teaching interests include childhood and youth, transnational migration, performance and identity, engaged methodologies and Central America. She is author of Migrant Youth, Transnational Families, and the State: Care and Contested Interests (University of Pennsylvania Press, 2014), an ethnography on unaccompanied child migration and detention in the U.S. She is currently completing a manuscript on the migration and deportation of indigenous Guatemalan youth. She is co-founder and editor of Youth Circulations (www.youthcirculations.com), a curated digital exhibit tracing the real and imagined circulations of global youth. She received a doctorate in anthropology from Johns Hopkins University and a MA/MS in International Public Service Management from DePaul University. As the recipient of Fulbright Schuman 70th Anniversary Scholar Award, Dr. Heidbrink will conduct a mixed-method study on the experiences of unaccompanied asylum-seeking children in Europe, including Greece, Italy, Belgium and the United Kingdom. Her host institution is the University of Birmingham’s Institute for Research into Superdiversity, where she hopes to bring her multimedia and ethnographic research with young migrants in the Americas in conversation with European studies of children on the move.

Nikolai Kalugin

Nikolai Kalugin

Global Scholar Award, University of Cambridge - Materials Engineering

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Nikolai Kalugin

Nikolai Kalugin

Global Scholar Award, University of Cambridge - Materials Engineering

Dr. Nikolai Kalugin has been a faculty member at New Mexico Tech since 2006. He earned his Ph.D. from the Institute of Applied Physics of the Russian Academy of Sciences. Before coming to NMT, Dr. Kalugin spent three years on the faculty at Texas A&M University in College Station, TX. With support of the Fulbright Global Award, Dr. Kalugin will focus on the study of novel two-dimensional materials. Aside from his scientific goals, Dr. Kalugin intends to learn about the internal research-related workings at both of his host institutions (University of Cambridge and University of Chile), and their approaches to transferring research results and innovations into practice.

Keliann LaConte

Keliann LaConte

Global Scholar Award, University of Edinburgh - Non-Formal Education

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Keliann LaConte

Keliann LaConte

Global Scholar Award, University of Edinburgh - Non-Formal Education

Over the past decade, Keliann LaConte has worked with library, education, and STEM professionals to support the “STEM in libraries” movement in the US. Keliann co-convened the 2015 Public Libraries & STEM conference and provides resources and training to US librarians through funding from NASA and the National Science Foundation. Her training includes a bachelor's degree in Chemistry from the University of Denver; she also has a master's degree in Environmental Science and Engineering from Caltech, and she performed astrobiology research at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory. There is tremendous potential for STEM-library collaborations to increase the public’s access to innovative STEM learning experiences in the UK. Libraries in the UK are striving to bring STEM-related skills to those in their community with the highest need. The University of Edinburgh, with its cutting-edge research and rich network of community-based collaborations, has much to contribute to this work. As a Fulbright Global Scholar, Keliann will connect scientists, engineers, educators, and librarians in the UK in order to provide innovative STEM learning experiences to those underrepresented in STEM disciplines. Her work will provide a snapshot of the state of STEM programming in UK libraries and develop promising directions for ongoing collaboration at the intersection of STEM and libraries.

Pamela Harris Lawton

Pamela Harris Lawton

Scotland Visiting Professorship, University of Edinburgh, College of Humanities and Social Science - Art Education

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Pamela Harris Lawton

Pamela Harris Lawton

Scotland Visiting Professorship, University of Edinburgh, College of Humanities and Social Science - Art Education

Lawton, a fifth-generation educator and native of Washington, DC, is a practicing artist and Associate Professor of art education at Virginia Commonwealth University. She holds an EdD in the College Teaching of Art from Teachers College, Columbia University and an MFA in Printmaking from Howard University. Her artistic and scholarly research revolves around visual narrative and intergenerational arts learning in community settings. Given the socio-political and cultural similarities between the USA and the UK, Lawton is interested in examining the social justice policies, practices, and pedagogies in both countries through an art education lens. For the past 15 years she has conducted Artstories (intergenerational community arts projects and research) in a variety of places: New York City, Washington, DC; Charlotte, NC; Richmond, VA; Nicaragua and Mexico and is co-writing a book, "On Common Ground: Community-Based Art Education Across the Lifespan" for publication following her Fulbright experience. Lawton hopes to establish a study away exchange between her institution and the University of Edinburgh. Details on her research and teaching can be found on her website: http://pamelaspress.wixsite.com/artstories

Heather J. Lewandowski

Heather J. Lewandowski

University of Leeds Distinguished Chair, University of Leeds - Physics

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Heather J. Lewandowski

Heather J. Lewandowski

University of Leeds Distinguished Chair, University of Leeds - Physics

Heather J. Lewandowski received her bachelor’s degree in physics from Michigan Technological University. She then moved to Colorado where she completed her PhD in Physics at the University of Colorado, working in the field of cold atomic physics. After a National Research Council postdoc at the National Institute of Science and Technology, she began a faculty position at the University of Colorado. Currently, she is an Associate Professor of Physics and Fellow of JILA. Her research focuses on creating cold molecules for interaction and reaction studies. As a Fulbright Scholar, she will be working at the University of Leeds on the intersection of laboratory atmospheric chemistry and cold molecule physics. Additionally, she will be studying how students develop experimental chemistry expertise in instructional labs.

Semion Lyandres

Semion Lyandres

University of Nottingham Scholar Award, University of Nottingham - History

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Semion Lyandres

Semion Lyandres

University of Nottingham Scholar Award, University of Nottingham - History

Semion Lyandres is Professor of History at the University of Notre Dame, where he has taught modern Russian and European history since 2001. Born and raised in St. Petersburg, Russia, he has lived, studied, and taught in Israel, Germany and the US. His most recent travels took him to Israel, where he was the Nirit and Michael Shaoul Fellow at the Sackler Institute of Advanced Studies, Tel Aviv University. As a Fulbright Scholar, he will be working on his new project on the politics of Russia’s 1917 February Revolution; it will examine the ways in which pre-revolutionary ideas about a transitional post-monarchical regime shaped the politics of the February Revolution, led to the creation of the Provisional Government, and contributed to the failure of Russia’s first attempt at democracy. The UK has long been a destination for scholars of Russia and of the Russian Revolution, which is one of the main reasons why he chose to complete his Fulbright at the University of Nottingham—a leading center in the field of revolutionary studies.

Michael Patrick MacDonald

Michael Patrick MacDonald

Queen's University Belfast (Creative Writing) Scholar Award, Queen's University Belfast - Creative Writing

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Michael Patrick MacDonald

Michael Patrick MacDonald

Queen's University Belfast (Creative Writing) Scholar Award, Queen's University Belfast - Creative Writing

Michael Patrick MacDonald is the author of the NY Times Bestselling memoir, All Souls: A Family Story From Southie and Easter Rising: A Memoir of Roots & Rebellion. At Northeastern University, MacDonald teaches Non-Fiction Writing & Social Justice Issues and a course about the North of Ireland. At Harvard he teaches about the role of story in restorative justice efforts, and a course in Memoir and Social Class. Based on his experience as a survivor of poverty, violence & the drugs trade, and as a memoirist, MacDonald developed a community-based trauma-informed writing curriculum, The Rest of the Story: Transforming Trauma to Voice and Agency, which has been implemented with survivors of loss to homicide, to heroin, and to incarceration. As a 2018-2019 Fulbright U.S. Scholar at Queen’s University’s Seamus Heaney Center, he will teach a course in Storytelling and Global Justice, looking at the role of story in Restorative and Transformative Justice efforts. In addition he will implement his writing curriculum with grassroots groups of survivors, community builders and activists in Belfast.

Charles McElroy

Charles McElroy

Cyber Security Scholar Award, University of Oxford - Cyber Security

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Charles McElroy

Charles McElroy

Cyber Security Scholar Award, University of Oxford - Cyber Security

Charles P. McElroy has a PhD in Information Systems from Case Western Reserve University, where he studied how disparate, interdisciplinary teams utilise cyberinfrastructure to form scientific arguments. He is currently a PostDoc scholar at the California Institute of Technology where he is investigating how human bias effects data-science research. Professor McElroy’s professional interests include machine learning, data science and issues related to human bias as they apply to cyber security research. As a Fulbright Scholar, he will be working with the University of Oxford’s Cyber Security Centre to design a taxonomy which will enable a broad spectrum of disciplines to collaborate in building a more effective risk assessment strategy. In his spare time, Professor McElroy enjoys working with at-risk and homeless youth as they achieve their academic potential.

Cathleen Miller

Cathleen Miller

University of Manchester Distinguished Chair (Humanities), University of Manchester - Creative Writing

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Cathleen Miller

Cathleen Miller

University of Manchester Distinguished Chair (Humanities), University of Manchester - Creative Writing

Cathleen Miller has traveled the globe to write books telling the stories of people and places. She’s interviewed heads of state on five continents, patients in an Addis Ababa hospital, rape camp survivors in Kosovo, and midwives in the mountains of East Timor. Her work sometimes places her in strange circumstances, for example cruising St. Petersburg to interview prostitutes, and running down a Brazilian mountain at midnight fleeing bandits. Miller’s biography of UN leader Nafis Sadik, Champion of Choice, is the result of ten years of work and many, many strange circumstances. Other publications include Desert Flower, the life story of activist Waris Dirie which describes the Somali nomad’s experience with female genital mutilation. In both Desert Flower and Champion of Choice, Miller demonstrates how issues affecting one individual are representative of a larger world order.  On her Fulbright she’ll utilise this same technique by interviewing female immigrants who have traveled alone to the UK seeking a new home. Cathleen Miller is a professor at San José State where she teaches creative nonfiction, as she plans to do at the University of Manchester.

Enid Montague

Enid Montague

Loughborough University Scholar Award, Loughborough University - Engineering

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Enid Montague

Enid Montague

Loughborough University Scholar Award, Loughborough University - Engineering

Enid Montague received MS and PhD degrees in Industrial and Systems Engineering from Virginia Tech in 2008, specialising in human factors and ergonomics engineering, the future professoriate, women’s studies and human computer interaction. Dr Montague is currently an Associate Professor in the college of computing at DePaul University and adjunct professor at Northwestern University’s Feinberg School of Medicine. She is the director of the Wellness and Health Enhancement Engineering Laboratory (WHEEL). Dr Montague has received numerous awards for her research including the Francis Research Fellowship for research that emphasises “longer, safer and healthier lives” and a Kl2 early career award from that National Institutes of Health (NIH) to explore trust in health care systems. Dr Montague’s research uses human factors and human-computer interaction methodologies, design principles and theories to understand health care systems to promote safety and patient-centred care. At present, Dr Montague explores the role of trust between people and technologies in health care work systems. She looks at organisational and design factors that affect both workers and patients with the overall goal of understanding technology mediated interactions and designing new and effective health technologies.

Elisabeth Motley

Elisabeth Motley

University of Roehampton Scholar Award, University of Roehampton - Dance

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Elisabeth Motley

Elisabeth Motley

University of Roehampton Scholar Award, University of Roehampton - Dance

Elisabeth Motley is a Brooklyn, New York-based choreographer, teacher and dancer. As a Fulbright Scholar, she will be teaching Dance Choreography and Improvisation at The University of Roehampton in London, England. Motley was drawn to the UK for its commitment to dance research and practice-as-research methodologies. She has received grants from the Mertz Gilmore Foundation, Foundation for Contemporary Arts, the Andrew Mellon Foundation, and is the recipient of the Hector Zaraspe Choreography Award. Her choreography has been presented at Jacob’s Pillow Dance Festival, The Whitney Museum, Lower Manhattan Cultural Council, Gibney Dance, Festival Oltre Passo – Italy, Springboard Danse Montreal, Danspace Project, HERE Arts Center, Movement Research at Judson, and the Joyce SoHo, among others. She has been an artist in residence at Chez Bushwick, Center for Performance Research, and Dance Theater Workshop. Elisabeth holds a BFA from the Juilliard School and MFA in Interdisciplinary Arts from Goddard College. She is an Assistant Professor of Dance at Marymount Manhattan College in New York City. www.elisabethmotley.com

Premilla Nadasen

Premilla Nadasen

Oxford-Pembroke Visiting Professorship in Politics and International Relations, Pembroke College, University of Oxford - History

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Premilla Nadasen

Premilla Nadasen

Oxford-Pembroke Visiting Professorship in Politics and International Relations, Pembroke College, University of Oxford - History

Born in South Africa and raised in the United States, Premilla Nadasen is Professor of History at Barnard College (Columbia University). She is most interested in visions of social change, and the ways in which poor and working-class women of color have fought for social justice. She has published extensively on the multiple meanings of feminism, alternative labor movements, and grass-roots community organising and is the author of Welfare Warriors: The Welfare Rights Movement in the United States (Routledge 2005) and Household Workers Unite: The Untold Story of African American Women Who Built a Movement (Beacon 2015). As a Fulbright Scholar, she will be at Oxford University to work on a biography of South African singer and anti-apartheid activist Miriam Makeba.

Jim Oleske

Jim Oleske

Cardiff University Scholar Award, Cardiff Law School - Centre for Law and Religion - Law

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Jim Oleske

Jim Oleske

Cardiff University Scholar Award, Cardiff Law School - Centre for Law and Religion - Law

Jim Oleske is a constitutional law professor at Lewis & Clark Law School, where he has been teaching since 2011. Prior to that, he served as Chief of Staff in the White House Office of Legislative Affairs during the first two years of the Obama Administration. Jim has also worked as an appellate attorney at the National Labor Relations Board, and he began his legal career as a law clerk to then-Judge Samuel A. Alito, Jr. Jim’s scholarship focuses on the intersection of religious liberty and other individual rights, and he has written extensively on the issue of religious exemptions. As a Fulbright Scholar at Cardiff University’s Centre for Law and Religion, Jim will be researching how and why the law of religious exemptions has developed differently in the United Kingdom and the United States, the consequences of that divergence, and the different possible paths the law in each jurisdiction may follow in the future.

Samir Parikh

Samir Parikh

EU Schuman Scholar Award, University of Oxford - Bankruptcy and Financial Restructuring

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Samir Parikh

Samir Parikh

EU Schuman Scholar Award, University of Oxford - Bankruptcy and Financial Restructuring

Samir Parikh is a Professor of Law at Lewis & Clark Law School, and the Kenneth H. Pierce Faculty Fellow and Director of the Bates Center for Entrepreneurship and Leadership at Lewis & Clark College. Professor Parikh’s research focuses on bankruptcy and financial restructuring involving both corporations and municipalities. He is also a lead editor for Bloomberg Law and holds a JD from the University of Michigan Law School. As a Fulbright-Schuman Scholar, Professor Parikh will conduct research at the University of Oxford assessing the evolution of EU insolvency policy and its effect on corporations and sovereign nations.

Hridesh Rajan

Hridesh Rajan

Cyber Security Scholar Award, Computer Science - Computer Science

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Hridesh Rajan

Hridesh Rajan

Cyber Security Scholar Award, Computer Science - Computer Science

Hridesh Rajan is the Kingland professor of Data Analytics in the Department of Computer Science at Iowa State University. Prof. Rajan's research interests are in data science, data infrastructures, programming languages, and software engineering, where he is most known for his design of the Ptolemy programming language, that showed how to modularly reason about crosscutting concerns, and the Boa programming language and its infrastructure that decreases the barriers to data-driven science and engineering. He has been recognised by the US National Science Foundation (NSF) with a CAREER award, an LAS Early Achievement in Research Award, a Big-12 Fellowship, the Kingland Professorship, an exemplary mentor for Junior Faculty award, and a US-UK Fulbright Scholarship. Prof. Rajan is a distinguished member of the ACM, and serves as an associate editor for the IEEE Transactions on Software Engineering and for SIGSOFT Software Engineering Notes. His recent efforts include co-leading efforts to establish three new Data Science educational programmes at ISU.

Lori A. Ringhand

Lori A. Ringhand

Scotland Visiting Professorship at Aberdeen, University of Aberdeen - Law

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Lori A. Ringhand

Lori A. Ringhand

Scotland Visiting Professorship at Aberdeen, University of Aberdeen - Law

Lori A. Ringhand is the J. Alton Hosch Professor of Law at the University of Georgia School of Law.  She teaches Constitutional Law, Election Law, and Comparative Constitutional Law. She is the author of numerous scholarly articles, and two books: Suprme Court Confirmation Hearings and Constitutional Change,published by Cambridge University Press; and Constitutional Law, published by Carolina Academic Press. She has a JD degree from the University of Wisconsin (where she grew up), and first spent time in the United Kingdom while earning a BCL degree from Oxford University. She is delighted to be collaborating with the University of Aberdeen law faculty to explore the different approaches to campaign finance regulation taken by the US and the UK, and can’t wait to enjoy the crisp winter mornings and snowy starry nights she has missed since leaving Wisconsin.

Steven Rozenski

Steven Rozenski

Queen Mary University of London Scholar Award, Queen Mary University of London - English

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Steven Rozenski

Steven Rozenski

Queen Mary University of London Scholar Award, Queen Mary University of London - English

Steven Rozenski is currently completing a study of the translation and transmission of medieval Continental spiritual and devotional literature in England from 1400 to 1700. After a Ph.D. in English literature at Harvard in 2012 and three years of postdoctoral work, he became an Assistant Professor of Medieval English Literature at the University of Rochester. His work on manuscripts, early prints, and other aspects of material culture will make his stay in London especially rewarding. Beyond the libraries and archives, a summer NEH seminar in York on medieval devotion a few years ago whetted his appetite for visits to parish churches, cathedrals, and monastic sites across England; a four-day walk from Newquay to Land's End the following summer cemented his love of hiking in the English countryside. After completing his book, the grant will allow him to begin work on an edition of an early sixteenth-century Carthusian manuscript from Hull and a collaborative project editing the works of Chaucer.

Erica Ollmann Saphire

Erica Ollmann Saphire

Global Scholar Award, Medical Research Council Laboratory of Molecular Biology - Molecular Virology

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Erica Ollmann Saphire

Erica Ollmann Saphire

Global Scholar Award, Medical Research Council Laboratory of Molecular Biology - Molecular Virology

Erica Ollmann Saphire, Ph.D. is a Professor of Immunology and Microbiology at The Scripps Research Institute. Her research explains at the molecular level how and why viruses like Ebola and Lassa are pathogenic and provides the roadmap for antiviral defense. The viruses she studies have extremely simple genomes, encoding just four or seven genes each. Yet the small handful of encoded proteins achieves an astonishing array of functions, at least 60 that are known. What is fascinating to Professor Saphire is how these molecules are multifunctional, often rearranging their 3D structures to adopt different forms to achieve different functions. The size and complexity of their molecular complexes mean that they often can not be crystallised for structural analysis. She is coming to the UK to work with Professor John Briggs to apply cryoelectron microscopy and cryoelectron tomography to these viral machines, and to understand their assemblies, changes in structure and function, and how antiviral defenses and vaccines can be better designed. The experience gained and collaboration built by the Fulbright grant will open new doors for her research, bringing molecules and assemblies into view that were previously out of reach, and providing new avenues to improve human health.

Robert Scanlan

Robert Scanlan

Queen's University Belfast (Irish Literature) Scholar, Queen's University Belfast - Poetry and Theatre

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Robert Scanlan

Robert Scanlan

Queen's University Belfast (Irish Literature) Scholar, Queen's University Belfast - Poetry and Theatre

Robert Scanlan is a theatre director and Artistic Director of the Poets’ Theatre, where he directs on a regular basis, working with Boston’s best actors, designers, musicians and poets.  He has been teaching at Harvard since 1989, and has directed over 70 productions in theatres throughout the world.  He was Professsor of the Practice of Theatre in the Department of English at Harvard and chaired Harvard’s Committee on Dramatics. He has worked in recent years primarily in New York City, and in Boston, with the recent addition of Belfast. Recent productions include his own translation (with Walter Valeri) of Nobel-laureate Dario Fo’s Mistero Buffo; an evening of four plays for women by Samuel Beckett, called Beckett Women; a staging of Henry Purcell’s and John Dryden’s semi-opera King Arthur, and an important revival of Dylan Thomas’ Under Milk Wood. Professor Scanlan will concentrate during his Fulbright residency on poets and the performance of their poetry, seeking out contemporary poets and playwrights in Northern Ireland and drawing them into the sphere of his Poets’ Theatre.

Konstantinos Serfes

Konstantinos Serfes

University of Exeter Scholar Award, University of Exeter - Economics

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Konstantinos Serfes

Konstantinos Serfes

University of Exeter Scholar Award, University of Exeter - Economics

Konstantinos Serfes graduated with a Ph.D. in economics from the University of Illinois at Champaign-Urbana. He spent six years at Stony Brook University and currently is a Professor at Drexel University in Philadelphia. His research interests are in the areas of microeconomics, industrial organisation and game theory. As a Fulbright scholar at the University of Exeter he will be working on issues related with the design of optimal turnover value-added tax (VAT) thresholds. The University of Exeter is an ideal place for this study given its strong tradition in public economics and the expertise of some of its faculty on tax related topics. Serfes is very excited about this opportunity and believes his visit to Exeter will be an important step in his academic career. In addition, he is looking forward to meeting new people in the UK, be exposed to new ideas and views and starting new research projects.

Kelly Sultzbach

Kelly Sultzbach

University of Liverpool Scholar Award, University of Liverpool - Environmental Literature

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Kelly Sultzbach

Kelly Sultzbach

University of Liverpool Scholar Award, University of Liverpool - Environmental Literature

Kelly Sultzbach spent childhood summers camping by the shores of Lake Erie, but education shuttled her from coast to coast on an intellectual journey that spanned a B.A. at Yale, a J.D. from UC Davis, and a Ph.D. from the University of Oregon. Now back in the Midwest, she engages students in British Literature and ecocriticism at the University of Wisconsin, La Crosse. As a Fulbright Scholar, Sultzbach will be teaching and completing research for a second book at the University of Liverpool, while collaborating with scholars both there and at the University of Leeds on the role of fiction, metaphor, and imagination in an era of climate change. She is also excited to develop environmental activities at popular literary tourism sites in southern England and to help design a gallery exhibit reflecting the changes in rural British art and poetry between the world wars. Studying in the UK allows her to explore how Britain’s deep attachments to both literary heritage and walking the countryside have shaped environmental values in the UK and beyond.

Rosemary Wakeman

Rosemary Wakeman

Global Scholar Award, Birkbeck College, University of London - History

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Rosemary Wakeman

Rosemary Wakeman

Global Scholar Award, Birkbeck College, University of London - History

Rosemary Wakeman was raised in New York and in California, where she received her PhD in History from the University of California Davis. She is Professor of History at Fordham University in New York and has published widely on cities and urban history. Her most recent publication is Practicing Utopia: An Intellectual History of the New Town Movement (University of Chicago Press, 2016). Her current book project is An Urban History of Modern Europe: 1815 to the Present to be published by Bloomsbury Press. Professor Wakeman toggles between New York and Paris. She enjoys drawing and visual art, spending time at the sea, and traveling with her family. For her Fulbright Global Scholar Award, Professor Wakeman will be researching a book-length study of Global Crossroads: Mumbai, Shanghai, and London. It focuses on the networks of global capitalism and diaspora in the mid-twentieth century and the movement of trade and money, people and cultures between the three cities.

Stephan Weiler

Stephan Weiler

University of Birmingham Distinguished Chair, University of Birmingham - Economics

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Stephan Weiler

Stephan Weiler

University of Birmingham Distinguished Chair, University of Birmingham - Economics

Stephan Weiler holds the William E. Morgan Chair as Professor of Economics at Colorado State University.  He went to 13 different schools across the US and Europe before working on his BA (Honors) in Economics and MA in Development Economics from Stanford University and his Economics PhD from UC-Berkeley. His research, teaching, and mentoring have spanned a variety of development and labor market issues in Africa, Asia, Europe, Appalachia, and the American West. His current work focuses on regional economic growth and development, combining theoretical, empirical, and policy analyses on information, innovation, industrial restructuring, rural/urban linkages, entrepreneurship, and the environment. He is distilling three decades of experience into the Regional Economic Development Institute (REDI@CSU) partnering with the City-Region Economic Development Institute at the Birmingham Business School (City-REDI) in the UK to provide timely information to enhance economic growth and development prospects for regions across the globe. The Fulbright Distinguished Research Chair award will accelerate the collaborative momentum the two institutes are developing, setting the foundation for continuing cutting-edge real-world research in the years to come.

Susan C. Weller

Susan C. Weller

Durham University Scholar Award, Durham University - Anthropology

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Susan C. Weller

Susan C. Weller

Durham University Scholar Award, Durham University - Anthropology

Susan C. Weller conducted graduate work in Guatemala and received a PhD from the University of California, Irvine, in Social Science. She was on the faculty of the University of Pennsylvania and is now Professor at the University of Texas Medical Branch. Her expertise is in research methods, including mixed methods, cross-cultural comparisons, and clinical research. Her publications focus on health beliefs and specifically, how to systematically study beliefs (Cultural Consensus Model). She has studied folk illnesses (evil eye) and biomedical diseases (AIDS, diabetes). Recent work has focused on patient-centered care and self-management strategies for diabetes. During the Fulbright Award, she hopes to extend that work using national datasets for the US and the UK. She has replicated UK patient-centered care studies in a US clinic and so, is very much looking forward to observing the NHS first-hand. She also hopes to update her monograph on Systematic Data Collection (with AK Romney).